WhiteDove23 
Member since Sep 28, 2009


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Re: “Citizen Mark: The Best-Known Man You Never Knew

The life of Mark Seeley reveals a great truth, latent in the shadows of a lonely darkness; a truth - now in The Light - that love is the way (to helping a person dealing with bipolar). May God Bless you and your father, Mark, with eternal life. And, thank you. I'll never forget you.
Sincerely, David A. Boyington

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Posted by WhiteDove23 on 05/06/2013 at 10:02 PM

Re: “Taking the Pulse

A Public Relations Campaign soon to be published at:
http://videocdradio.podbean.com
How you, as a concerned individual, can sustain The Freedom of Speech essential in artistic expression of fiercely independent Multimedia Radio Producers at a University Radio Station:




The University Pulse Radio Network
~~ POWER TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE RADIO SHOW ~~
David A. Boyington
Pulse Radio Producer (9yrs.)
videocdradio@gmail.com


A LETTER TO THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Shannon Morgan

The Arbiter Newspaper
~An Independent Voice~

Boise State University







September 9th, 2009

Dear Shannon,

Congratulations on your second appointment to Editor-in-Chief of The Arbiter. I'm very pleased to hear that you will again be in charge. I come to you with 2 rather important issues that I would like to discuss: I would like to first comment on an extremely essential article that you wrote; then, I will recommend a powerful new creation in our ongoing multimedia revolu-tion that ArbiterMedia just might be ready to engage.
I'm a Senior at B.S.U. with a major in Mass Media/Journalism; please, use Brad Arendt as a reference as to my involvement in student activities; I've been with Student Radio 9 years, since it's existence as a class connected with The Broadcast Club under the direction of Pro-fessor Bob Rudd (please, use Professors Bob Rudd & Dan Morris for reference as well.)

I quietly, to myself, make a document supported argument that my role as a Radio Producer (behind the scenes involvement in structuring Student Radio over an 8 year period) was the key essential to the growth of Student Radio and the eventual organizing and creation of The University Pulse Radio Network.

I'm the only one who really knows the entire political process involved in dealing with (just like you are now, in my opinion) a blatantly oppressive university administration towards the free-dom of speech that students (who are especially involved in sensitive issues regarding B.S.U. and it's surrounding communities, and who are organized in multimedia) by right of The Amer-ican Constitution have legal protection in any federal court against oppression of expression--violation of The First Amendment is a federal offense.

"The independent voice of students, The Arbiter, had a difficult time getting its voice heard recently." ~ Shannon Morgan ~




I was walking on the 2nd floor of the SUB (a few years back), just above the ASBSU offices and Student Activities reception area, and I couldn't help but to notice that a great deal of remodel-ing was taking place, the renovation of an entire suite; this was at a time when The Broadcast Club (Student Radio) could not even afford to purchase CD's for Student Radio Producers so we could burn our radio show productions to a CD, then, deliver it personally to KBSU Radio. A simple, but revealing, mathematical formula containing mostly sociological, political, capital-istic, public relations, and psychological factors equated to a rather startling--First Amendment offensive--conclusion.

With research that I was doing in 2 sociology classes, about this same time, plus interviews and consultation with 2 Professors in the Sociology Department, together with information from one of my Communication's Professors, directly related to the results of interviews with African-American teachers for potential positions as Professors at B.S.U., I was painfully made aware of, and had to accept the fact that, Boise State University is a racist institution of educa-tion--an arena in shadows of darkness, thriving in the philosophy of a persistent human atro-city sustained by the illegal institutionalized oppression of The Freedom Of Speech by students.

I sent a letter to The Arbiter Newspaper that directly accused the B.S.U. administration of being guilty of a federal offense, in progress, in the continual oppression of student's rights to The Freedom Of Speech--an abusive act against The First Amendment; I, then, personally delivered the same letter to the administrative V.P. of Student Affairs.

The stage had been set, especially because prior to this I spent a great deal of time as lobbyist to uniting Student Radio with ASBSU; I presented this idea to Senator-at-Large, Annah J. Merkley who, then, crafted the bill and presented it for a formal vote of the Senate; it passed, and for the first time since late ‘80’s (when B.S.U. administration took KBSU Student Radio, literally, eliminating the sound and access of B.S.U. student voices to FM Radio air waves) ASBSU & students had, at least, some access to student broadcasting again, albeit, limited to AM in Boise & Twin Falls and FM in McCall (and for a short while, on the first Student Radio Internet; until mysteriously deleted)—but it was a necessary step to allow time for Student Radio development into The University Pulse Radio Network; constant reminders to the Radio Producers in the form of threats to shut down The Broadcast Club & eliminate Student Radio Classes came from Comm. Dept. Chair, Rick Moore because, in his opinion, we were having some difficulty meeting our production schedules as Producer membership reached an all-time low, so we all pitched in and produced extra shows to fill this temporary void.

Moore believed that not enough student interest existed to keep the program—but the Produ-cers, a fiercely independent group, where not to be outdone. With energy positive, mind opti-mistic, I told then President of The Broadcasting Club, Levi Chic, that we were on the verge of greatness, that things will soon change for the Producers; he laughed, and laughed some more. (What about the 2 letters? Had I played the Ace of spades, the highest trump card up my sleeve?)

Well, now, two weeks had gone by since sending (by email) the letter to The Arbiter News-paper; wondering why it had not yet been published in print, I went to the Arbiter's office and was told that it wasn't received by The Arbiter Newspaper, and that it must have just disap-peared—“gotten lost in cyber space.” My instincts told me that I was on the right trail.

I had also discovered what the huge remodeling job on the 2nd floor of the SUB was all about. An elaborate suite for the new Culture Center appeared to be the primary focus of the adminis-trative V.P. of Student Affairs—she even showed up for the opening ceremonies to help cut the cake, and she never made a personal appearance of any kind at Student Radio, and she refused my interview invitation to President Kustra to appear on my Radio Show: Power To Make A Difference.

Then, quite suddenly, this V.P. of Student Affairs was taken completely out of the equation when she was arrested for DUI with blood alcohol level of approximately 2.1, driving with her young child in the car resulting in another charge, endangerment.

However, before her arrest, suspension and resignation I believe she may have done the right thing, regarding Student Radio. What did happen to the letter that I hand delivered to her sec-retary with accusations of student oppression practiced by the administration?

Was the all out support of the Culture Center a public relations campaign to soften B.S.U.’s reputation of institutionalized racism and oppression that was marketing deterioration for the administration’s capitalistic agenda? According to responses in interviews with me and 3 B.S.U. Professors (2 Soc., 1 Comm.) it most certainly had the characteristics of and likelihood of being just exactly that, a PR campaign.

“Her goal for the Cultural Center staff this year will be to plan programming that will raise awareness of marginalized groups, white privilege, identity and oppression,” referring to Ro Alvarado Coordinator. (located on Cultural Center web site)

KBSU FM Radio (taken from B.S.U. students by administration) was developed by students for students, an arena of expression; B.S.U. administration started receiving a huge annual grant for taking KBSU FM Radio, silenced a powerful form of student expression putting capitalistic gain ahead of student education, ordered the students to pay a large annual fee included in tuition to help support KBSU FM Radio, created a labor pool in the student populous to supply inexpensive labor to help operate KBSU FM Radio, and does not allow B.S.U. students access to its air waves for any type of freedom of expression or artistic multimedia production. “Some-thing is rotten in the state of Denmark?”

I was working at KBSU FM Radio about the time that the administration took it over. But, an-other capitalistic oppressive motivated “take over” executed by B.S.U. administration against the students also rather concerns me; not many people are aware (because of the time frame) that this even occurred.

In the fall of 1970, a structure built explicitly for B.S.U. students, and financially funded with students money, was completed on the 3rd floor of the SUB; it was called The Lookout Coffeehouse, a nice place for students to gather, listen to live music of several bands booked while on tour; this was definitely a stage for artistic expression, a forum for students to inter-act, to engage in their right to Freedom of Speech.

It was an extremely huge success, standing room only coffeehouse concerts; I remember it quite well; I was the first Lookout Coffeehouse Chairman responsible for its total operation and introduction to B.S.U. students, as well as to the surrounding Boise communities.

Students had a big hit on their hands—but, sometime after I left B.S.U. campus life, the admin-istration took it from the students, renting it out to other organizations and to corporate activi-ties.

This is a strong form of institutionalized oppression directed at student’s First Amendment Rights to Freedom of Speech at their own university.

Thus, it wasn’t just one form of student oppression that motivated me to write those 2 letters of accusation; from my perspective (a societal critical power-conflict perspective) there exists a multitude of reasons for having written them. Only confirming my motive is the recent oppressive assault conducted by the B.S.U. administration in its—behind closed doors—unfor-giveable conspiracy to actually threaten financial security and overall operation involving Freedom of the Press, the student’s First Amendment Rights under the United States Constitu-tion, and the enormous multimedia educational opportunities that thrive and continue to grow in the journalistic arena provided, nurtured and cherished in The ArbiterMedia Newspaper or-ganization that reflects 75 years of student media production and community involvement.

Time, now, to take pen in hand to bring forth the unleashed ‘60’s rebel—who again lives for the people’s cause—relentless rebel dwelling, latent, deep in a restless Soul; so, then, I live again!
The administration, perhaps, is ill at ease with the concept of a student multimedia merger. It appears that the time has finally come; an idea Brad Arendt and I theorized about 5 years ago; and I think that a great office location for directors and staff of central operations is, of course,
The Lookout Coffeehouse.

And, oh yes—what of the letter hand delivered to administrative V.P. of Student Affairs? There was, at least in my opinion, a rather interesting development—perhaps, an act of admission to guilt--not to long after the letter’s delivery; the office of the V.P. of Student Affairs (somewhat mysteriously) bestowed a $5,000.00 grant to Student Radio, The Broadcasting Club; a long awaited celebration was in order because our new leader who followed Levi Chic (Producer of Too Much Distortion) was the first Student Radio President/Coordinator awarded a monthly salary.

She brought an extremely optimistic energized focused work ethic that completely transformed the direction and valued purpose in the artistic motivation essential to a higher level of edu-cation, training and the growth in societal, political, spiritual consciousness so desperately needed in each Student Radio Producer to confidently compete in the professional arena of a revolutionary production of high quality multimedia.

She is Maureen Clark, Producer of the radio series: Girl Volcano. My lobbying strategies direc-ted towards ASBSU involvement caught the attention and devoted interests of Senator Leah Sweat; she, then, united in common cause with Girl Volcano; Student Radio and ASBSU were successfully united in calculated effort to secure the independent voice for B.S.U. students, along with citizens of the Treasure Valley, and potentially, the Global community, as well.



~~ Two paragraphs from an interview with Maureen Clark published on the Woman’s Center web site; conducted and written by B.S.U. journalist, Aubrey Salazar. ~~




~~ Maureen Clark ~~
Girl Volcano




“We [student radio staff] want our own station; if we can get representation, we can raise awareness, and raise listenership,” exclaims Mo (Maureen Clark). Currently, Boise State Radio dedicates a mere two hours per night to student programming on the AM signal, an unpopular timeslot when the signal is weakest. Changing the timeslot is not possible because of stringent programming, so Clark turned to Boise State students for help. With ASBSU senator Lea Sweat, Clark proposed a student station independent of Boise State Radio. The proposal passed, and if approved by President Kustra and the State Board of Education, Student Radio will receive $2.00 from student fees. This will enable the students to plan and build a separate station.

Mo would like Student Radio to wholly reflect the entertainment tastes of Boise State students. She has even assigned herself a timeline of five years to complete the transition. Most of Mo’s peers will have graduated by the time her efforts are realized, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be imagined.

Women's Center
Article by Aubrey Salazar


And so it was, a vision realized; Boise State University’s Student Radio & The Broadcast Club survived institutionalized oppression in the hard fought battle put forth by a fiercely indepen-dent group of Radio Producers determined to give the air waves of Freedom of Speech back to its rightful owners—the students of Boise State University; President Kustra’s signature comp-leted transformation of Student Radio which took on its new image of an independent commer-cial-free voice: The University Pulse Radio Network which became the 274th officially recogniz-ed student run organization at B.S.U.

However, for these radio warriors protecting our Freedom of Speech to disarm in thoughts of a battle ended would be poor judgment in the philosophy of a societal critical power-conflict perspective, with my intuition sensing the presence of a higher political power than the capital-istic driven B.S.U. administration, a stronger political force that also lurks in shadows of dark-ness, that which holds the license to KBSU, of course, the dept. of education. I argue that the dept. of ed. is not Student Radio friendly.

This has become quite evident in the arena of current events; the mathematical equation with its multitude of indicative factors does not balance; this formula significantly lacks essential mathematical harmony that would legitimize the recent imperialistic threats imposed by B.S.U.’s administration on students in an attempt to control, oppress and significantly alter the established financial well-being of multimedia organizations created for the education, training and development of future professionals in mass media.

There exists absolutely no legitimate reason for a 100% budget cut regarding the financial op-erations of The University Pulse Radio Network; I argue that every student registered at Boise State University is more than willing to chip in 2 bucks in favor of financial support essential to the continued growth of their independently operated Student Radio Station.

How many students were asked to give their opinions as to whether or not funding of their own Radio Station should be cut? Furthermore, let’s analyze assault tactics employed by B.S.U. administration in the threat to financially cripple healthy operations currently in place that sustain the multimedia operation of The Arbiter Newspaper.

B.S.U. students, when taking a hard realistic look at the unreasonable actions set in motion by B.S.U.’s administration, will unite for positive change in the name of education, independent artistic expression, and to protect, preserve and experience their rights as citizens determined by The First Amendment in the U.S. Constitution—The Freedom of Speech.





~~ Below Radar Operations ~~

A stroke of luck, perhaps, was the only reason that The University Pulse avoided being charged, then, prosecuted by the FCC with up to $20,000 in fines, if convicted; about the same time, a PR spin on documented protocol in B.S.U.’s political process, governed by The University Pulse Advisory Board, was (secretly) launched providing a smoke screen that, likely, prevented B.S.U.’s administration from having to face federal charges of alleged practices condoning the discrimination and oppression of women. (Perhaps, there will be more on this, later.)

Time, now, for VideoCDRadio.
Shannon, VideoCDRadio presents video related to your experience in the audio portion of this Radio Show. The focus is on the musician and her/his music. Two excellent media players are provided (free) to view this production.

Download Adobe Media Player to your computer; this player is probably the best available. Download VideoCDRadio, which I sent to you via YouSendIt.com, to your computer. Bring VideoCDRadio into your new Adobe Media Player, then, play on “Full Screen.” The format is MPEG-4.

The second way to view VideoCDRadio is by Flash Media Player; download it, if you don’t already have it on your computer, then, click here: http://videocdradio.podbean.com, go down to the orange and brown player, titled: VideoCDRadioPower; click on Power To Make A Difference. Give video 1 or 2 minutes to load.

This production of VideoCDRadio is available for you to play on ArbiterOnline.com, legally. About 3 years ago, I talked to Brad Arendt concerning broadcasting a radio show on ArbiterOnline.com, but there were too many copyright issues, new license fees, so it didn’t work; however, I have eliminated the copyright and license fees issues; I’m in touch with each artist/band and am a contracted member of their Public Relations Organization in New York.

Thank you, Shannon, for your time and consideration; I appreciate it, immensely. Kick back, and enjoy, VideoCDRadio. Peace.

Sincerely,
David A. Boyington
Pulse Radio Producer (9yrs.)
videocdradio@gmail.com

Posted by WhiteDove23 on 09/28/2009 at 11:19 PM

Re: “Taking the Pulse

~~ Regarding University Pulse Radio ~~
In response to: Taking the Pulse
Student-run radio faces future without funds
By Amy Atkins
_____________________________________________

University Oppresses Students’ First Amendment Rights

Written by: David A. Boyington
videocdradio@gmail.com


Background

During spring 2009 semester, Boise State University lost a court battle in a civil case when a B.S.U. Organization sued the B.S.U. administration for violating students' rights to Freedom of Speech--but this didn't stop B.S.U. administration from employing the same oppressive tactics to The University Pulse Radio Network Organization; the administration took away the $50,000 (entire) annual University Pulse Radio budget, not allowing each student the freedom to chip-in $2.50 at registration which funded the University Pulse student owned and operated radio station. The admin-istration gave no legitimate reason for cancellation of the budget; at the same time, each student is forced to pay (included in tuition) a similar amount to $2.50 for the funding of a another radio station, KBSU FM, which is licensed to the Idaho Dept. of Education (KBSU FM, at one time, belonged to the students; B.S.U. administration, literally, took it from the students to turn it in to a capitalistic venture, in addition to receiving close to five-hundred-thousand-dollars, yearly, in federal grants). Students, although contributing large sums of money to KBSU FM annually, are not allowed access to the air waves—they cannot voice their opinions on the air.

Oppression

Boise State University administration in close partnership with the Idaho Dept. of Education (owner of KBSU Boise State Radio broadcasting license) cater to corporate interests of a restrictive, oppressive, conservative educational process for B.S.U. students—to market graduates for corporate control.

Currently, the B.S.U. administration educational philosophy aggressively nurtures a restrictive, oppressive, conservative political, societal controlling protocol that violates--in extremely abusive fashion—the legal rights of students’ Freedom of Speech protected by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution—this is a federal offense.

Evidence of this illegal practice is in the behavior of the B.S.U. administration to completely cut funding to the students’ independent owned and operated Radio Station—University Pulse Radio.

The administration aggressively oppresses any options for a student to chip-in $2.50 during registration to promote student artistic multimedia expression, the Freedom of the Press, the Freedom of Speech, and the continued education & training of future professional broadcasters.

To help put this in a societal perspective, a direct quote follows; this quote is taken from a text book which is required in sociology classes at B.S.U. and is cited at the end of the quote. Title of this section is: Humanistic Goals.

The following 2 paragraphs are taken directly from one of the text books used in sociology classes at Boise State University, titled:
Social Problems; A Critical Power-Conflict Perspective.


Humanistic Goals

“Some progressive reformers, such as John Dewey, viewed the social control function of education as important but tried to moderate the oppressiveness of much schooling by emphasizing broader, more humanistic concerns. These reformers believed it was essential to political democracy for schooling to promote personal and intellectual development and produce an educated citizenry. Some of the changes in educational policy that these reformers supported are reflected in progressive terms such as personality development, the whole child, and social and emotional growth, which have come to dominate much written educational policy over the last several decades. In recent years, however, both the code words and innovations of Dewey-type progressivism have been attacked by conservatives as too permissive and providing too little discipline for students. More conservative thinking about education has come to predominate in many areas, and today much schooling remains too restrictive or oppressive. Concern with discipline, obedience, efficiency, and productivity has often won out over humanistic ideas.”
“Educational progressivism has never been implemented on a large scale. Even liberal reformers have accepted the existing economic system as a given. The contradictory goals—fostering the development of “the whole child” and creating a suitable worker for an ever-changing capitalistic economic system—that have shaped U.S. schools have multiple purposes and thus multiple outcomes. Public schooling has met many justifiable educational needs. The skills of communication—speaking, reading, and writing—have an intrinsic value and are important to the development of “whole” human beings. Many innovations have made some schools more pleasant places to be. However, schools have all too frequently been troubled, unpleasant, alien worlds, at best only partially meeting children’s needs. As Charles E. Silberman has written, many schools are “grim joyless places,” filled with rules and regulations, with classes too large for effective teaching, with a lack of civility between students and teachers, and all too frequently with limited intellectual stimulation” (Feagin 195).


Works Cited

Feagin, Joe R., Feagin, Clairece Booher. Social Problems; A Critical Power-
Conflict Perspective. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. 1997.

Posted by WhiteDove23 on 09/28/2009 at 11:09 PM

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