Remember when late-90s ska band No Doubt gets attacked by princess phones in the video for "Spiderwebs"? All those corkscrew cords wrapping the band in a freaky, tangled web of communication? Well, the new technological spiderweb hails from an even more Tragic Kingdom. Yes, we're talking about the spiderweb-like shattered screen of a precious iPhone.

Made from oh-so-breakable glass, the iPhone has long had the misfortune of falling prey to screen-crackage. But the new iPhone 4, with both its front and backsides crafted from glass, is a klutz's worst nightmare. Not to mention, the slippery little beast loves to wiggle right off high counters when the phone is set on vibrate.

Luckily, there's a local store that can fix all your smart phone calamities. Cell Me, a repair store with two locations--one on Five Mile Road and one in the Vista Village Shopping Center--will repair cracked screens, fix water damage, repair ports, speakers and microphones, and replace missing or broken buttons. For replacing the screen on the iPhone 3G it's only $75. But for the new iPhone 4, which has considerably pricier parts, it's $225. Guess for now, we'll have to shell out the bucks until Apple starts making products that are more structurally sound than peanut brittle.

This video doesn't have anything to do with iPhone screen-crackage, but it is freaking hilarious. And probably NSFW if you have your speakers cranked all the way up.


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