Not All Heroes Wear Capes: Lowe's 'Heroes' Renovate Boise WCA 

click to enlarge MICAH DREW
  • Micah Drew
A familiar smell of paint has been filling a number of rooms inside the Boise offices of the the Women's and Children's Alliance on the corner of Washington and Eighth streets. And just outside, a half-dozen doors, off their hinges, are leaned against the walls. Meanwhile, outside the WCA dumpsters are filled with rubble. Outside a half dozen old doors leaned against the wall and the dumpster brimmed with rubble. The building, more than 70-years old is getting a much-needed renovation.

“We’re working to making it a more of a usable space,” said Andy Kirkendall, the manager of the South Meridian Lowe’s store, which came to the rescue of the WCA building which was constructed in 1940, with an upstairs renovation completed in 1957. This summer's renovation has been primarily focused on the WCA's upstairs offices.

Over the course of two days, nearly 80 Lowe’s employees ripped out carpets, demolished unnecessary walls, replaced doors and painted nearly everything. Additionally, an area inside the WCA offices that used to be an old dormitory, will soon become office space, and a family therapy room now has more space, with built-in shelving units and new carpet. Each year each Lowe’s U.S. store chooses a community improvement project their employees can donate their time and energy to.

“We put in our application and the Lowe’s employees reviewed all the projects. They voted and decided to combine forces and help us out,” said Kristine Campbell-Davis, Facility Services Director for the WCA.

This year, the Lowe’s Heroes from around the Treasure Valley opted to pooled their funds and manpower to work on the WCA project. When Boise Weekly visited the in-progress renovation, employees were wearing red shirts with the “Lowe’s Heroes” logo on the back, but also adorned plenty of paint stains- either off-white Asiago, Feeling Blue or Juniper Breeze.

All of the materials - paint, carpeting, doors - was donated to the project, totaling more than $10,000.

“And there’s a much better turnout this year,” said Kirkendall. “Usually there are only about three people from each store, but this year there are more than 15. It really speaks to the personal connection the employees have to this project.”
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