Note: Slow News in an Instant World 

The news business is a strange animal in the age of Twitter. I can literally count the seconds it takes at least one media outlet in town to Tweet a link to new content after a press release about said content reaches my e-mail in-box. And at the risk of sounding like an old curmudgeon, I'll say that I fondly remember the days when we alties stood back from the breaking news fray and let the mainstream folks duke it out. But times change.

One day last week, a reporter walked into my office a bit miffed after another media outlet Tweeted a link to a story. The same story, mind you, that he'd blogged about minutes earlier but had been waiting for a proofreader to OK before it went live and, of course, went out on the old Twitter. He'd been beaten by minutes in cyberspace and he wasn't happy about it. But while we are knee-deep in the breaking news world these days--at least online--in print, we still fiercely cling to the alt-weekly model, which sets aside urgency in favor of depth.

That same reporter wrote this week's main feature. "Alms for the Creative" is a story Josh Gross has been reporting on over several months and just as we were getting it to the press last week, Idaho Business Review published a story on crowdfunding. This time, though, Gross wasn't so miffed. While crowdfunding is a trending topic among creative circles currently, thus far, much of the reporting has hovered near the surface with tales of the successes and failures of those who've used the fund-raising method. In search of more depth, Gross took it two steps further, asking what sort of protections are in place for the donor when a project is funded and yet fails to come to fruition, as well as whether the SEC laws regulating crowdfunding transactions are too antiquated to be relevant in the world of Web 2.0 giving.

And in sticking with giving for just a moment ... I hope you read this week's News feature. We don't publish many feel-good stories in BW, and George Prentice's "Top Chefs" is a bittersweet kind of feel-good, holiday piece.

On behalf of all of us at Boise Weekly, enjoy your Thanksgiving holiday.

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