Hit #1
Hit #2
  • Issue of
  • Sep 21-27, 2005
  • Vol. 14, No. 12

News

  • Features
  • Welcome to the Dance

    There's an old saying in journalism that writing about music is like dancing about architecture. Using one medium to describe another has always been a challenge to writers, poets, visual artists and, yes, even architects. But the art of architecture affects many of us on a purely subconcious level. Every city is full of buildings--they keep the rain off our heads--but they can also make us feel constricted, open, enlightened, ready to work or ready to sleep. If somebody didn't care about design, and about the roofs over our heads as something that should be beautiful in their own right, we'd live in a cardboard-box world.
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  • Features
  • Good Buildings Go Up, Good Buildings Come Down

    Most architects in Boise will wax eloquent about the signature buildings in the downtown area designed by themselves and their firms. They are also quite generous with praise for the public and commercial projects designed by their fellow architects.
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  • Features
  • Q&A with Mike Simmonds

    Mike Simmonds, AIA, is a principal at ZGA Architects and Planners, as well as a member of the Boise City Design Review Committee. BW spoke with him about how the design review process works.
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  • Boise Weekly's New Home
  • Features
  • Boise Weekly's New Home

    Over a year ago, Bar Bar, Inc., a private company owned by Bingo and Sally Barnes, purchased a building located between 5th and 6th Streets on Broad Street. This building, built originally sometime during the 1950s, had seen a variety of businesses inhabit its space. At one time or another it had been an auto parts store, a beauty supply store, a school, a children's daycare, a bar, a warehouse and most recently half the building has been The Venue--an all ages space for young people to come see great touring bands. In June this year, the tenants in the front of the building moved out and Bar Bar, Inc.'s construction crew moved in, readying the space for an August move into the space for the staff of Boise Weekly. In effect, the move would triple the square footage of the old 4th Street office spaces, give BW a brand new look, improve our morale, give us not one, but two of our own bathrooms, a kitchen, a conference room and a lounge. It gave us room to breathe and grow in the next decade into a stronger, bigger, better independent newspaper.
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Cartoons

Food & Drink

  • Food Review
  • Big Jud's

    Big Jud's. The name says it all. Even if you've never been there, it's likely you can make an educated guess about the cuisine. If you're thinking Italian right now, you need to get out more.
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Arts & Culture

Music

Screen

Rec & Sports

Opinion

  • Lingo Yarns
  • Head Spinning Round the Sun

    I'm not sure who to listen to now. First reports of Hurricane Katrina told us of an unprecedented disaster. The feds' slow response told us they didn't think it was such a big deal. But Big Brother evactuated the city anyway. Then reports of rapes, suicides and child murders at the Superdome, gangs of looters patrolling the streets ... quick descent into chaos.
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