Boise Looks To Next Historic Home Project 

The plan is for improvements to the exterior of the Hayman House to begin as early as Fiscal Year 2019, which starts this October. The city will go on to tackle the interior in FY 2021.

click to enlarge Erma Andre Madry Hayman (circa 1920) played piano in her all-family orchestra. The 1907 sandstone house where she lived,  still stands at 617 Ash St. - LAURIE PEARMAN
  • Laurie Pearman
  • Erma Andre Madry Hayman (circa 1920) played piano in her all-family orchestra. The 1907 sandstone house where she lived, still stands at 617 Ash St.

Though neighbors and visitors just got their first glimpse of the newly renovated James Castle House on April 28, the City of Boise is already setting its sights on another ambitious project to reinvent a former home as a cultural destination.

The Capital City Development Corporation and the City of Boise have crafted a conveyance agreement stating CCDC will turn over ownership of a nondescript, century-old stone structure at the corner of Ash and River streets, better known today as the Hayman House, to the city. It was there that Erma Hayman—a Boise institution herself, who died in 2009 at the age of 102—lived through most of the 20th century in a neighborhood that was once home to Boise's largest African-American community.

click to enlarge Student Rie Misaizu searches for artifacts from the Hayman House in May 2015. - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • Student Rie Misaizu searches for artifacts from the Hayman House in May 2015.

The plan is to turn the Hayman House into a public gathering space that will host workshops, lectures or artist-in-residence programs. The $500,000-plus renovation will be funded with city dollars and a $277,000 donation from CCDC. The plan is for improvements to the exterior of the Hayman House to begin as early as Fiscal Year 2019, which starts this October. The city will go on to tackle the interior in FY 2021.

Meanwhile, the Boise City Department of Arts and History continues to celebrate its recent opening of the James Castle House, where the iconic artist lived from 1931 until his death in 1977. The single-story farmhouse was renovated into a center for contemporary and historical showcases, tours and its own artist-in-residence program. The first artist, New York City-based Keiran Brennan Hinton, will live at the home from May through August. Two more artists have also been selected for future three-month stays: Rachel Rickert (January-April, 2019) and Cindy Steiler (May-August, 2019).

"As they often do, our Department of Arts and History knocked this out of the park," Boise Mayor Dave Bieter said at the April 28 grand opening of the Castle House.

Rather than resting on those laurels, Arts and History employees are already preparing to employ some of that same passion at the Hayman House.


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