BW's Treefort 2019 Playlist: Panelists Give Tips on Kicking Food Waste to the Curb 

click to enlarge Left to right: CJ Pennington, Sydney Bennett, Michelle Kwak, Julie D'Agostino and Leah Rainey spoke at "Totally Wasted!" - LEX NELSON
  • Lex Nelson
  • Left to right: CJ Pennington, Sydney Bennett, Michelle Kwak, Julie D'Agostino and Leah Rainey spoke at "Totally Wasted!"
For its 2019 edition, Treefort Music Fest has made its environmental impact a major issue, purchasing green energy through Idaho power and eliminating the use of plastic cups at the Main Stage. So Foodfort's March 21 panel discussion, "Totally Wasted! Food Waste & Sustainability," fit right in.

"If food waste were a country, it would be the third largest emitter of carbon dioxide," said panelist Lea Rainey, the founder of Roots Zero Waste Market, a plastic-free grocery store slated to open in Garden City. "...From the farm to the market, we're losing about 20 to 24 percent of the food that feeds us."

Rolling Tomato Food Recovery Founder Julie D'Agostino, another panelist, chimed in, "About $1,000 [of food] per year is put into the landfill or waste bins for a family of four."

The two were joined on stage at Boise's Basque Center by Sydney Bennett, a solid waste environmental analyst for the City of Boise; KIN and Art Haus Bar Pastry Chef Michelle Kwak, who strives to reduce food waste in her cooking; and Proud Source Water President CJ Pennington, whose company sells water in aluminum bottles. Over the course of an hour, the group dove into everything from the City of Boise's compost and orange bag programs to personal responsibility and the challenges of reducing the use of plastics at home.

It's a complex issue, but in a nutshell, here are some of the panel's top tip for living sustainably and reducing food waste:

Bennett:
  • Avoid plastics when possible, particularly #1 plastics that can't be recycled in the orange bags.
  • Don't put compostable plastics in your compost bin. They can't be composted through the city.
  • Check the CurbIt website for a full guide of what can be recycled/composted and how to make it happen.
click to enlarge Kwak contributed carrot cake macarons made with carrot pulp that would have otherwise been food waste. - LEX NELSON
  • Lex Nelson
  • Kwak contributed carrot cake macarons made with carrot pulp that would have otherwise been food waste.
D'Agostino:
  • If you have more food than you need, look for another person/organization that could use it before throwing it away.
  • Be mindful of everything you buy and eat. Awareness is the first step toward reduction.
Kwak:
  • Eat/use as much of every food item as possible. For protein, melt off the fat for reuse. With carrots, cut off and re-purpose the tops.
  • If you can't participate in city composting, try composting at home.
  • Eat seasonally; your produce will last longer.
  • If produce is ugly or getting old, dehydrate it or make a "compost smoothie."
  • Use shampoo bars to reduce the use of plastic bottles.
Pennington:
  • Think before you buy. Vote with your dollar for companies that care about sustainability.
  • When you're out and about, pick up plastic trash. Set a goal of two pieces per day.
Rainey:
  • Keep it local. The less your food has to travel, the more environmentally friendly it is.
  • When in doubt, throw it out: Contamination is the biggest challenge facing recycling programs.
  • Buy in bulk to avoid having more food than you need, and bring your own containers to reduce the use of plastic bags.
  • If you're stuck with a plastic or glass container, reuse it instead of trashing it.
Pin It
Favorite

Comments


Comments are closed.

More by Lex Nelson

© 2019 Boise Weekly

Website powered by Foundation