UPDATED: City Council Votes to Rename Two Boise Parks to Honor Boise Valley First Peoples 

Quarry View Park in Boise could soon be renamed Eagle Eye Park to honor the chief of a small band of Weiser Shoshones who called Idaho their home in the late 19th century.

City of Boise

Quarry View Park in Boise could soon be renamed Eagle Eye Park to honor the chief of a small band of Weiser Shoshones who called Idaho their home in the late 19th century.

Updated Post: May 8, 2:20 p.m.:
The Boise City Council has voted to rename Castle Rock Reserve to Chief Eagle Eye Reserve, and Quarry View Park to Eagle Rock Park. The changes were made to reflect Native Americans' history and continuing contribution to the City of Boise.

"I have felt so much pride being a Boisean and being part of this City Council, since so many steps have been taken toward reconciliation and healing with the original inhabitants of the Boise Valley," said City Council Member Lisa Sanchez.

The move was supported by a number of descendants of those peoples, approximately a dozen of whom traveled to Boise to attend the meeting.

"This is our homeland, too, and we just want to make sure that [the Boise City Council] honor[s] our people, and never forgets that we'll always be here," said Lori Edmo-Suppah of Fort Hall.

Original Post: May 6, 3:06 p.m.:
Two local parks could soon have new names after the Boise City Council votes on Tuesday, May 7, whether to recast them in honor of indigenous people.

"I think it's important for people to recognize that this is part of our history," said city spokesman Mike Journee. "[The Boise City Council and local tribes] are talking about going forward with this conversation and about mutual respect."

At its regularly scheduled meeting, the council will consider renaming Quarry View Park to Eagle Rock Park and Castle Rock Reserve to Chief Eagle Eye Reserve. An additional resolution would reassert the city's directives to honor indigenous peoples' continuing contributions to the City of Boise and its surrounding environs.

Eagle Eye was chief of a band of 70 Weiser Shoshone who, in 1878, moved to the mountains of Idaho secretly instead of to a reservation. "Eagle Rock" is the traditional name of the balancing rock above Quarry View Park, and is a significant site for the tribes that inhabited what is now the Treasure Valley, including the Burns Paiute Tribe of Oregon, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs, also in Oregon, the Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of Nevada and the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of Idaho.

"This is an important step in preserving the historical significance of an area that carries deep meaning for the Shoshone-Bannock and Paiute tribes," wrote Boise Mayor Dave Bieter in a statement. "It's deeply important that we remember and honor all who have a history and connection with this great place [where] we live."

Journee said that several trails in the Boise Foothills have been renamed to reflect Boise's original inhabitants, and that this latest package of measures is the fruit of a larger conversation between the city and local tribes.

"It's something that's been talked about for quite a while as we got to know the issue and understand the history and symbolism of that through conversations with the tribes," Journee said. "It kind of made sense to do this."
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