If Legislator Had His Way, Idaho Wouldn't Be Springing Forward 

Some parts of the United States don't observe daylight saving time, including Hawaii, most of Arizona, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam and the Northern Marianas.

There's no way around it: you either went to bed early, or you're a bit more bleary-eyed.

Daylight saving time arrived at 2 a.m. local time Sunday, March 9, ushering in several months of extra evening sunlight.

Some parts of the United States don't observe daylight saving time, including Hawaii, most of Arizona, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam and the Northern Marianas.

Daylight saving time actually began when Germany, in an effort to save coal for its World War I effort, reduced artificial lighting. The United States followed suit in 1918. But since the end of World War II, daylight saving time has been optional for U.S. states.

Several studies debate whether daylight saving time truly saves anything or simply sucks time away. However, the New England Journal of Medicine reported in 2008 that some heart risks go up in the days just after the spring-time change.

And if Idaho House Majority Leader Rep. Mike Moyle had his way, we wouldn't be "springing forward" tonight. Moyle has introduced a bill in the current session of the Legislature that would amend Idaho Code to exempt Idaho from observing daylight saving time.

Moyle says DST "disrupts families, businesses and individuals" and that "several studies even show that accidents increase during the week that daylight savings time is observed."

But Moyle's bill still hasn't surfaced before the Idaho House State Affairs Committee for a hearing.


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