Laurel Thatcher Ulrich 

Thursday, April 14

Viewing Thoreau relics at a natural history museum, Laurel Thatcher Ulrich uncovered an unintentional botany experiment.

UNH Media Relations

Viewing Thoreau relics at a natural history museum, Laurel Thatcher Ulrich uncovered an unintentional botany experiment.

If Americanism was a religion, Henry David Thoreau would be among its chief saints, and his treatise, Walden, would be one of its most important texts. Idaho native, Pulitzer Prize winner and MacArthur Fellow Laurel Thatcher Ulrich took a group of Harvard University students to a natural history museum to see Thoreau's relics. They found his pond turtle, a "fish that taught them to write" and a 116-year-old tortilla that gave them new insights into botany. The author of Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History and A Midwife's Tale will visit Boise State University as part of The Idea of Nature Public Lecture Series to deliver a talk, "Adventures in a Natural History Museum," on Thursday, April 14 at the Boise State Student Union Simplot Ballroom.

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